Providing resources and trai­ning in the practices and tools of the digital humanities
  • Home
  • Digital Humanities Now »
Subscribe to Digital Humanities Now feed
Community-Curated Content Published by the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media
Updated: 1 hour 40 min ago

Job: Assistant Professor/Digital Scholarship Futurist, Oklahoma State University Library

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 13:30

From the ad:

Proactively study and apply emerging social, political, and technical trends and best practices in order to advance digital scholarship initiatives, develop tools and technologies to meet research and publication needs, and be a leader in the area of research data emerging trends and best practices.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Endowment Director, Wikimedia Foundation

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 13:00

From the ad:

As the professional focused on developing sustainable support for the Foundation, the Endowment Director will report to and work with the Chief Advancement Officer. Succeeding in this environment will require taking a hands-on approach to connecting with a broad array of donors, using traditional development methods, while implementing the infrastructure required for supporting a sustained long-term endowment.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Digital Humanities Librarian, Brown University

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 12:30

From the ad:

The Brown University Library seeks an innovative and service-oriented individual to be the Digital Humanities Librarian.  The Digital Humanities Librarian plays a central role in the integration of digital tools, resources, and methodologies with traditional resources and approaches to research, teaching, and learning in the humanities.

Read more here.

CFP: Digital Technologies, Bodies, and Embodiments – Computers and Composition

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 12:00

From the CFP:

This special issue will examine questions of digital media, bodies, and embodiments with specific attention to writing studies itself: how writing composes embodiments and how embodiments compose writing within and through digital technologies and institutions. We are calling for scholarship that offers theoretical, methodological, and/or pedagogical work that contributes to the latest research on, about, with, and between (dis)connections of digital technologies, bodies, embodiments, and writing in digital-cultural contexts, texts, and events.

Read the full CFP here.

Funding: Visualizing Digital Scholarship in Libraries and Learning Spaces

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 11:30

From the post:

North Carolina State University has launched a Mellon-funded project for visualizing digital scholarship in libraries and learning spaces… This call solicits proposals for block grants from library or museum systems that have visualization installations. Block grant recipients can utilize funds for ideas ranging from creating open source scholarly content for visualization environments to developing tools and templates to enhance sharing of visualization work. An advisory panel will select four institutions to receive awards of up to $40,000.

Read the full post here.

Editors’ Choice: Days of Future Past – Augmented Reality and Temporality in Digital Public Humanities

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 11:00

In July 2017, I presented a version of this talk on a panel on “Temporality” at the Keystone Digital Humanities Conference (#keydh on Twitter) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The project  I discuss here, a digital tour of the Nightingale-Brown House, will debut in September 2017. I’ll update this post with a direct link when we go live!

I wanted to start by outlining three of the major questions I hope to raise in this discussion of a digital house tour I’ve been working on at Brown University’s Public Humanities program. This presentation will focus on the details of our particular project, but I hope this overview is useful to people who are specifically interested in the metaphor of the tour in DH as well as anyone who might have thoughts on temporality as it relates to DH work and the interfaces we rely on (or develop) in various initiatives.

This talk takes its title from “Days of Future Past,” a 1980 storyline from Marvel Comics’ Uncanny X-Men serial in which a member of the superhero team travels back in time to stop the bleak future she calls home from existing in the first place. “Welcome to the 21st century,” reads a caption box on the opening splash page of #141. Chris Claremont, John Byrne, and their collaborators present readers with a dystopian vision of 2013 and a ragtag team of surviving heroes so desperate that they’re “toying with the basic fabric of reality” in an attempt to travel back in time to literally rewrite history.

I’ve found the phrase “Days of Future Past” useful when considering the place of temporality in digital humanities projects. Its success, for me at least, is in the way this particularly poetic sequence of words disrupts my sense that the past, present, and future are distinct and discrete things. It demonstrates the exploratory potential and the inherent limitations of speculative thinking, reminding us that our visions of the future are inevitably shaped by the historical and cultural conditions in which they are envisioned, and that they are often reliant upon particular versions of the past.

 

Read the full post here.

Opportunity: Join the ADHO Steering Committee

Tue, 07/18/2017 - 13:30

From the post:

The Alliance of Digital Humanities (ADHO) is looking for enthusiastic Digital Humanists who would like to actively help further DH in all its breadth and diversity on a global scale. The ADHO Steering Committee (SC) has several vacancies to be filled, starting August 8, 2017, until July 1st 2018 (when the governance structure of ADHO will change). Extensions of service in some comparable roles after July 1, 2018, may be considered.

If you’re interested in helping ADHO and the worldwide DH community become a more transparent, inclusive, and beneficial network for the many organizations and individuals that make up the ADHO community, then please consider becoming a candidate for one of these volunteer offices.

Read the full post here.

CFP: Alternative Beginnings – Towards an-Other history of immersive arts and technologies, College Art Association Annual Conference 2018

Tue, 07/18/2017 - 13:00

From the CFP:

This panel seeks to explore alternative pathways to contextualize our current obsession with virtual environments and to question our conceptions of what counts as immersive technologies. Bringing together recent insights by media archaeologists (Parikka and Huhtamo, 2011) and decolonial thinkers (Mignolo, 2011) we seek presentations that explore suppressed, neglected and forgotten histories, alternative conceptualizations of immersive technologies that break with the Eurocentric canon as well as contemporary expressions that address such gaps through new media practices.

Read the full CFP here.

Job: Director for Strategic Initiatives, MIT Press

Tue, 07/18/2017 - 12:30

From the ad:

DIRECTOR FOR STRATEGIC INITIATIVES, MIT Press, to operationalize key developments within the Press’s strategic plan, helping establish a foundation for ongoing growth and innovation by bridging the vision for the business with its operational implementation. Will help build the Press’s capacity for digital innovation. A primary objective will be to obtain external funding to support the creation of a Publishing Futures Lab at the Press, a new model for incubating and insourcing digital innovation within a nonprofit publisher. Key responsibilities include grant writing and project proposal and development, establishing technical capacity for open source alternatives, building out an author services model across workflow, and helping grow a technology-centric experimental culture at the Press.

Read the full ad here.

Job: LibraryPress@UF Coordinator, University of Florida Libraries

Tue, 07/18/2017 - 12:00

From the ad:

The Coordinator supports production and development needs for all LibraryPress@UF imprint works (e.g., new publications, republications, expanded editions, digital works, etc.) for design, layout, creation, coordination on metadata (e.g., library records, CIP, and publisher information), developing and maintaining design files and processes, and overall production needs. The LibraryPress@UF focuses on works that are born digital, with print-on-demand options integrated with sole source production, and with digital files hosted as Open Access through the Libraries.

Read more here.

Job: Digital Projects Manager, University of Dayton

Tue, 07/18/2017 - 11:30

From the ad:

The Digital Projects Manager will coordinate activity of all digital project contributors from across University libraries. They will direct the workflow for the projects, manage daily scanning activities, and supervise a production team of student workers. They will collaborate with other staff in the University Libraries and with campus partners to ensure that technical standards and professional practices are followed, monitor production numbers, and work with contributors to meet project deadlines, resolve potential copyright or privacy concerns, review scanned items and metadata for quality control and upload the digital content to our institutional repository.

Read more here.

Editors’ Choice: Preprint for “The Spine of American Law”

Tue, 07/18/2017 - 11:00

Kellen Funk and I have co-authored an article titled “The Spine of American Law: Digital Text Analysis and U.S. Legal Practice.” The article has been recently accepted for publication in the American Historical Review. It is currently scheduled for the February 2018 issue. Here is our abstract.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, the majority of U.S. states adopted a novel code of legal practice for their civil courts. Legal scholars have long recognized the influence of the New York lawyer David Dudley Field on American legal codification, but tracing the influence of Field’s code of civil procedure with precision across some 30,000 pages of statutes is a daunting task. By adapting methods of digital text analysis to observe text reuse in legal sources, this article provides a methodological guide to show how the evolution of law can be studied at a macro level—across many codes and jurisdictions—and at a micro level—regulation by regulation. Applying these techniques to the Field Code and its emulators, we show that by a combination of creditors’ remedies the code exchanged the rhythms of agriculture for those of merchant capitalism. Archival research confirmed that the spread of the Field Code united the American South and American West in one Greater Reconstruction. Instead of just a national political development centered in Washington, we show that Reconstruction was also a state-level legal development centered on a procedure code from the Empire State of finance capitalism.

The authors’ original manuscript (or preprint) is available at SocArXiv (or at SSRN). This is the version that we submitted for peer review in July 2016. The final version will be different, in part because of our revisions in response to the helpful peer reviews, and in part because we have expanded our original corpus by some 40% and plan to expand it further before publication. While we think these revisions greatly strengthen the essay, we don’t think that they invalidate this earlier version. So we are making the authors’ original manuscript available now following Oxford University Press’s policy.

 

Read the full post here.

Resource: Hand-Colored Photographs from 19th Century Japan

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 13:30

From the post:

The colorized images you see here come from the NYPL’s large collection of late 19th century Japanese photography, taken by photographers like the Italian-British Felice Beato and his Japanese student Kimbei, who “assisted Beato in the hand-coloring of photographs until 1863,” then “set up his own large and flourishing studio in Yokohama in 1881.” The archive provides “a rich resource for the understanding of the political, social, economic, and artistic history of Asia from the 1870s to the early 20th century.” These images date from between 1890 and 1909, by which time much of Japan had already been extensively westernized in dress, architecture, and style of government.

Read more here.

Job: Supervisory Librarian (Chief, Digital Collections Management and Services), Library of Congress

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 13:00

From the ad:

This position reports to the Director, Technology Policy, in Library Services and is responsible for leading the newly established Digital Collections Management & Services Division. The division is responsible for providing support for the full lifecycle management of digital collections. This includes executing digitization projects using in-house or contractor digitization services.

Read the full ad here.

Job: Head of STEM and Entrepreneurship, Northeastern University Libraries

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 12:30

From the ad:

The Head of STEM and Entrepreneurship leads research and instruction services in support of STEM and business-related schools and affiliated labs, centers, and institutes.  You’ll supervise talented staff and shape core teaching and learning activities including course-integration strategies, collection development, and research consultation services.  Working collaboratively across the library and beyond, you’ll help launch an online learning program and play a key role designing/implementing services supporting the research lifecycle, including data management and digital repository services.

Read the full ad here.

Editors’ Choice: Distributions of Words Across Narrative Time in 27,266 Novels

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 12:00

Over the course of the last few months here at the Literary Lab, I’ve been working on a little project that looks at the distributions of individual words inside of novels, when averaged out across lots and lots of texts. This is incredibly simple, really – the end result is basically just a time-series plot for a word, similar to a historical frequency trend. But, the units are different – instead of historical time, the X-axis is what Matt Jockers calls “narrative time,” the space between the beginning and end of a book.

In a certain sense, this grew out of a project I worked on a couple years ago that did something similar in the context of an individual text – I wrote a program called Textplot that tracked the positions of words inside of novels and then found words that “flock” together, that show up in similar regions of the narrative. This got me thinking – what if you did this with lots of novels, instead of just one? Beyond any single text – are there general trends that govern the positions of words inside of novels at a kind of narratological level, split away from any particular plot? Or would everything wash out in the aggregate? Averaged out across thousands of texts – do individual words rise and fall across narrative time, in the way they do across historical time? If so – what’s the “shape” of narrative, writ large?

 

Read the full post here.

Editors’ Choice: The Form of Digital Projects

Thu, 07/13/2017 - 11:00

Unlike print, the form of digital projects has a direct bearing on the ideas they convey.

Not too long ago we used word processors to write documents on computers. The act of writing itself was called “word processing.” The excitement around the revolutionary new technology (first electric typewriters, then computer applications) inspired a new name for writing, defined by the instrument with which we produced it. Now the technology has become common place and we just write documents, whether electronic or on paper. The term “word processing” has fallen out of use.

So, in another decade, will the long-form, peer-reviewed digital humanities projects, or interactive scholarly works, produced today be known as just books? Is it our excitement about the new technological instruments of production that has us searching for a new name? Time will tell. What we know for certain is that this new form of scholarly publication has significant implications for the practices and processes of authoring, publishing, archiving and preservation.

 

Read the full post here.

Announcement: Zotero 5.0 Release

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 13:30

From the post:

We’re delighted to announce the release of Zotero 5.0, the next major version of Zotero and the biggest upgrade in Zotero’s history. Zotero 5.0 brings many new features, as well as a huge number of changes under the hood to improve Zotero’s responsiveness and stability and lay the groundwork for other big developments coming soon. We’ll be highlighting some of the new features in upcoming posts, but for now see the changelog for more details on all that’s new.

Read more here.

Announcement: Neatline 2.5.2 Release

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 13:00

From the announcement:

New release!

First, a huge thank you to Jamie Folsom and Andy Stuhl from Perfomant Software Solutions LLC, who did the heavy lifting on the coding for this release. We couldn’t have done it without them. We’re grateful, as well, to Neatline community member Adam Doan (@doana on Github) from the University of Guelph, whose code contributions made Neatline’s first accessibility functionality possible.

Read the full announcement here.

Resource: USAboundaries v0.3.0 Released

Tue, 07/11/2017 - 12:30

From the post:

I’ve recently published version 0.3.0 of my USAboundaries R package to CRAN. USAboundaries provides access to spatial data for U.S. counties, states, cities, congressional districts, and zip codes. Of course you can easily get contemporary boundaries from lots of places, but this package lets you specify dates and get the locations for historical county and state boundaries as well as city locations.

Read the full post here.

Pages


Directory of DH Scholars

Looking for collaborators, expertise, or other scholars with related interests? 

Please see our list of affiliated scholars at KU.

If you would like to be included in this list please complete our affiliated scholars form.

 

KU Today
Home to 50+ departments, centers, and programs, the School of the Arts, and the School of Public Affairs and Administration
KU offers courses in 40 languages
No. 1 ranking in city management and urban policy —U.S. News and World Report
One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
44 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times